SJQ1 Heart of the Enemy (2e) Released at RPG Now!

From the Website:

Heart of the Enemy

A little information is a very frightening thing.

Hundreds of years ago, the elves and the goblinkin fought for control of known space in the Unhuman War. Though the elves won that first campaign, they know the goblinkin are clamoring for a rematch. Recently the elves commissioned a few good adventurers to infiltrate the base of a new race of advanced orcs known as the scro. They were hoping to gain information on their enemies’ numbers and plans.

The news they found was far worse.

The scro have discovered a weapon of awesome destruction, one that can lay waste to entire worlds. But the key to unlock its power lies lost and forgotten.

Even now the scro are searching for it. When they find it, they will wreak destruction and revenge on the inhabited planets.

The elves are looking for an adventuring team who can win this desperate race, and find the key first. Your PCs may be the only thing that stands between known space and doom.

Heart of the Enemy is a 96-page adventure set in the Second Unhuman War. The second of a two-part series, it can either be linked with the previous Goblin’s Return or it can be played as a stand-alone adventure.

Heart of the Enemy is designed for four to six characters of levels 8 to 11.

Product History

SJQ1: “Heart of the Enemy” (1992), by Rick Swan, is the 6th Spelljammer Adventure, but the first in the Spelljammer Quest series. It was released in March 1992.

Begining the “SJQ” Series. The Spelljammer line included six adventures, spread across three different module codes. The “SJA” Adventure series included four adventures (1990-1991), but the “SJS” Saga (?) code contained just one (1991), as did the “SJQ” Quest code (1992).

Despite the varying module codes, SJQ1: “Heart of the Enemy” is a a sequel to SJS1: “Goblins’ Return” (1991). Both are set during the Second Unhuman War; the plot also continues directly through the adventures, with players of “Heart of the Enemy” searching for the witchlight key that they learned about in the previous adventure.

“Heart of the Enemy” was the final adventure for the Spelljammer line, unless you count
SJR8: “Space Lairs” (1993), which features numerous short encounters.

Adventuring Tropes. As with many 2e adventures, “Heart of the Enemy” is heavy on plot, with numerous events driving the first half of the adventure. However, there’s quite a bit of exploration in the latter half.

Expanding Wildspace. “Heart of the Enemy” expands the Spelljammer line primarily through its support of Spelljammer’s one and only metaplot event: the Second Unhuman War, which began in “Goblins’ Return” and continued through some of the Spelljammer novels.

“Heart of the Enemy” also details a new crystal sphere: Shadowspace. As in most of the Spelljammer adventures, this doesn’t really enlarge the setting, since Shadowspace is seen once and then isn’t heard from again.

Future History. The Second Unhuman War focused on the Scro emerging into Wildspace and beginning a war for its dominance. The War sort of ends in this adventure, though it never got a definitive and canon ending due to the cancellation of the Spelljammer product line a year later. More details on the Scro and their war can be found in “Campaign Classics: The Scro”, an article by Roger E. Moore, written for Dragon Annual #1 (1996).

About the Creators. Swan authored numerous books for TSR in the late ’80s and early ’90s, most of them for the AD&D line. The same year, Swan also authored FR14: “The Great Glacier” (1992).

About the Product Historian

The history of this product was researched and written by Shannon Appelcline, the editor-in-chief of RPGnet and the author of Designers & Dragons – a history of the roleplaying industry told one company at a time. Please feel free to mail corrections, comments, and additions to shannon.appelcline@gmail.com.

Available for $4.99 USD.

Get it here or by clicking on the picture!

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