A True Chronological Reading of the Last 10 Honorverse Books, Part 3 @DavidWeberBooks

Diane Morrison

I’m re-reading the last ten books in the Honorverse space opera series by David Weber in true chronological order. That is to say, I am reading it all as if it were one big story, not several separate books, in the order in which the events described took place (as much as possible.) I will even be skipping around between books as necessary. If you’d like some insight into why I’m doing that, and what I recommend you read before we begin (if you’d like to follow along,) please see my other posts in this series:

Prerequisites:War of Honor, Crown of Slaves

Suggested: “Service of the Sword” from Service of the Sword.

Books Required for this Post:The Shadow of Saganami, At All Costs

Background:

The Kingdom of Manticore is once again at war with the Republic of Haven. Unbeknownst to the characters, but knownst to…

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A True Chronological Reading of the Last 10 Honorverse Books, Part 2 @DavidWeberBooks

Diane Morrison

I’m re-reading the last ten books in the Honorverse space opera series by David Weber in true chronological order. That is to say, I am reading it all as if it were one big story, not several separate books, in the order in which the events described took place (as much as possible.) I will even be skipping around between books as necessary. If you’d like some insight into why I’m doing that, and what I recommend you read before we begin (if you’d like to follow along,) please see my first post in this series.

Prerequisites:War of Honor, Crown of Slaves

Suggested: “From the Highlands” from Changer of Worlds, “Fanatic” from Service of the Sword.

Books Required for this Post:Torch of Freedom

Background:

The Kingdom of Manticore is once again at war with the Republic of Haven. Unbeknownst to the characters, but knownst to us, Havenite…

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A True Chronological Reading of the Last 10 Honorverse Books, Part 1 @DavidWeberBooks

Diane Morrison

I’ve now finished reading the Honor Harrington “Honorverse” space opera series. Mostly, as I’m sure you can tell by my reviews, I’ve been impressed. I thought some books were better than others, and like many fans, I became impatient with sections that were repeated between books.

But as a writer, I began to notice things. Like how those repeated scenes were always told from different points of view. Like how the events of one book changed the course of other books, even when those events were happening simultaneously. In the last few books of the series, not all of which directly featured Honor Harrington, Weber even started separating groups of chapters by month and date, so that you could track when simultaneous events were taking place.

I began to wonder at his process.  I started to see exactly how grand in scope the tale was that he was telling…

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Book Review: Torch of Freedom by David Weber & Eric Flint

Diane Morrison

Torch of Freedom (Honorverse: Wages of Sin, #2)Torch of Freedom by David Weber
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I chewed through the Honorverse Saga over the last little while because a housemate is also reading the series, and I’m trying to keep ahead of him so that we can talk about it. So expect a lot of Honorverse reviews from me in the near future.

I find myself wondering at what Weber’s process was when writing this and the remainder of the series. I suspect he said to himself:

“Okay, I’ve got this huge George R.R. Martin-style saga to tell, but if I did it that way, I’d have a book so thick you could use it as a brick with a little mortar. Welp; I’m really telling three different stories, aren’t I? So which events fit into the three different stories? Story one: Honor’s perspective. Story two: Cachat and Zilwicki. Story three: Michelle Henke and…

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Book Review: Storm from the Shadows by David Weber

Diane Morrison

Storm from the Shadows (Honorverse: Saganami Island, #2)Storm from the Shadows by David Weber
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I chewed through the Honorverse Saga over the last little while because a housemate is also reading the series, and I’m trying to keep ahead of him so that we can talk about it. So expect a lot of Honorverse reviews from me in the near future.

This book is a significant departure in style from Weber’s other Honorverse works. As a result, it has gotten mixed reviews. Some readers accept it as a natural extension of previously-established technique and perspectives; others dislike it because it loses some of the personal third-person focus that has characterized many other books in the series.

I find myself wondering at what Weber’s process was when writing this and the remainder of the series. Many of the events are repeated from other books. I suspect he said to himself:

“Okay, I’ve…

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