A close pass by a red dwarf star, and a note on interplanetary and interstellar distances

SelfAwarePatterns

First, in case you haven’t heard: 70,000 Years Ago, Another Star Flew by the Edge of the Solar System | RealClearScience.

According to an international team of astronomers, about 70,000 years ago a red dwarf star — nicknamed “Scholz’s star” for the astronomer who discovered it — passed by our solar system just 0.8 light years distant. In fact, 98% of the 10,000 simulations the team ran projected that the star’s path grazed the outer edges of the Oort Cloud, a region of space filled with icy planetesimals which marks the final boundary of our solar system.

…Scholz’s star is now twenty light years away and won’t be returning anytime soon. However, Dr. Coryn Bailer-Jones of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy calculates that we may receive another visitor in the distant future. Last December, Baller-Jones reported that the rogue star HIP 85605 may pass as close as .132…

View original post 395 more words

Advertisements

Comet Song

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/comet-67p-song-captured-by-rosetta-spacecraft-1.2834947

If you’re a space science (and fantasy) nut like me, you’re sitting on the edge of your seat right now, reading everything coming out of the Philae and Rosetta spacecraft project.  This is what a comet sounds like; or at least, what this comet sounds like.  Do you think the starhands hear noises like this sailing in the cosmos?  I sure do!

Half the stars in the universe may exist outside of galaxies

SelfAwarePatterns

Every so often you get a reminder of how little we know about the universe: Rogue stars outside galaxies may be everywhere | Science/AAAS | News.

You’ve heard of rogue planets, floating through the universe untethered to any solar system. Now meet rogue stars, which drift through space with no galaxy to call home. A new study has come to the startling conclusion that as many as half of all stars in the universe may be rogue, having been ejected from their birthplaces by galaxy collisions or mergers.

The article goes on to discuss that this is just a possibility at this point.  Not everyone is convinced.

“We’ll have to confirm, but they are hard to accommodate with the star model,” he says. Also, he points out, if there is a huge population of stars outside galaxies, we should see a noticeable number of supernovas occurring out in…

View original post 162 more words